Learning without boundaries

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The Pyr Project

How We Started .  .  

 

What happened in our homes :

 

As parents we were reading to our children, and we fell upon a book, ‘Journey to the River Sea’ by Eva Ibbotson - and as we talked about it we realised that we were all bemoaning the lack of a ‘joined up’ education for our children. . . Subjects don’t link up to describe life ‘in the round’ . . And so we did just that for our own children . . .

 

What happened in the education sector :

 

Well, in some ways we don’t need to tell you, really.  More and more regulation, erosion of quality face to face time with teachers, increasing legislation and guidelines, and the swop and changes in curriculum in the last 10 years while our children were growing up, are all too well documented.

 

As we were thinking about ‘joined up education’ so the Rose report came out, re-designing Primary Education to fit in with how we were thinking. . .cross curricular - how very fortunate !

 

We were asked by people in the ‘learning out of school’ sector to come and do our workshops :

 

The home education sector seemed interested and invited us to join them at HESFES, their home education fair.  There Daniel directed a full production of his play ‘Carlos’s field’, and we took the Journey to the River Sea research to the Gifted and Talented market.

 

Westminster Abbey Education Department engaged us to write a specific unit about one of their scientists - and illustrate the story we tell with music by composers who are buried in the Abbey.  It seemed to appeal to the teachers, parents and pupils alike.

 

We found that we liked working together. It was great !

 

 

Why we started : What we believe about learning and teaching:

a global view is important          

Today’s child is fully aware of the internet and the plethora of information which exists in the ether.Tomorrow’s adolescent will need to be able to DISCERN who to believe, and

 

HOW TO DECIDE WHAT IS IMPORTANT.

 

The key component of any new learning is this discrimination, this ability to give ‘weight’ to a snippet of information, according to context.

Teaching our children that EVERYTHING IS INTER-RELATED will help them to discern between information that ‘adds up’, and incomplete, biased or inconsistent material.

So all our units are cross curricular.

We are fascinated by the power of music; some of us are professional musicians. MUSIC IS REMEMBERED IN A WAY WHICH IS UNIQUE -  how the mind organises itself and the unique way it recalls music

bears more detailed research, in our view.  

 

Also, STORYTELLING is a very potent communication tool, with adults and children alike.  Children respond to stories most immediately, and if they can participate in the making of the story, then all the better

 

IN PYR WORKSHOPS WE MAKE SURE WE LINK MOST OF WHAT WE TEACH TO PIECES OF MUSIC, WHICH ILLUSTRATE  AND EMPHASISE THE EMOTIONAL CONTENT OF OUR STORY.

THIS MAKES OUR WORK MEMORABLE TO CHILDREN

 

“Music, uniquely among the arts, is both completely abstract and profoundly emotional. It has no power to represent anything particular or external, but it has a unique power to express inner states or feelings. Music can pierce the heart directly; it needs no mediation.”

― Oliver Sacks, Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain